Wednesday, 24 March 2010

The iPad First Impressions

The iPad: First Impressions

The first time I heard about the iPad, I thought it was a joke. I eventually discovered it was a real product so I snickered at the name; I thought to myself that it is a funny way for Apple to pun its own line of digital products. But then I realized that it is actually a very nifty idea for a product.

First, iPad is undeniably sticky—it sounds like Apple's eponymous digital genius, the iPod, which has spawned a line of its own, starting from the classic edition to its more advanced babies such as the iPod Touch.

The most common reaction to those who have encountered the iPad for the first time is a mixture of surprise and pleasant confusion: 'Huh? Did I hear you right? Did you say it with an eh or an ah?' That is why it sticks to one's mind because the moment you hear it, you start to think about it.

Next, the iPad lives up to its name—and I just do not mean the Apple brand. It is very literal that it is almost funny. I remember when I first heard about it, after I got over its pronunciation issue, I thought about its appearance. My friend told me that the iPad resembles a clipboard or a tablet, and I just could not believe that it was going to look like that. Somehow, we all got used to the fancy and metaphorical model names of gadgets that when we find something so bluntly named, it is just incredible.

The iPad looks like a homogeny of a slate, a thick pad of paper, a clipboard, a tablet, and a binder cardboard. One of its greatest features is that you can use it as if it really is a clipboard cradled on the crook of your arm. It works on a touchscreen interface, which eliminates the need for a keyboard or a pen, thus freeing the hands. However, unlike most touchscreen gadgets, the iPad is a multi-touch device: that means you can pinch, drag, and tap two visual objects on the screen with your fingers at the same time. It is a lightweight gadget at 68 grams and 13.4 millimeters thick.

Think of it as a giant iPod Touch with the ability to create documents via iWork, which is Apple's office program that enables its users to create slide presentations, word documents, spreadsheets, and the like. The iPad can store and play music and videos through iTunes. It also has Wi-Fi capabilities; therefore, you can experience seamless Internet surfing, chat, and email.

An iPod will have you squinting at the screen to have a good look while the iPad provides a large enough screen to properly enjoy videos and movies.

Apple considers the iPad as its revolutionary project that will bring all other competitors to shame. We have yet to experience the lasting power of this magical product and its 150,000+ applications. It just made me think: how in the world am I going to use all 150,000 of them?

Wednesday, 10 March 2010


The iPad is a tablet computer developed by Apple Inc. Announced on January 27, 2010, it is positioned in a category between a smartphone and a laptop computer.

Similar in functionality to a larger and more powerful iPhone or iPod touch, it runs a modified version of the same operating system (iPhone OS), with a user interface redesigned to take advantage of the larger screen. The iPad has a 9.7-inch (25 cm) LED backlit multi-touch display, 16 to 64 gigabytes (GB) of flash memory, Bluetooth, and a 30-pin dock connector to sync with iTunes and connect wired accessories. Two models have been announced: one with 802.11n Wi-Fi and one with 802.11n Wi-Fi and 3G (which can connect to HSDPA cellular networks), and Assisted GPS. Both models may be purchased with three different storage capacities.

As Apple's first device to use its iBookstore service and companion iBooks ebook reading application, the iPad has been compared with Amazon's Kindle and Barnes & Noble's Nook.

Source: Wikipedia